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How To Distinguish The Good Or Bad Techniques Of Filipino Martial Arts By Grand Tuhon

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  • How To Distinguish The Good Or Bad Techniques Of Filipino Martial Arts By Grand Tuhon

    HOW TO DISTINGUISH THE GOOD OR BAD TECHNIQUES OF FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS

    by Grand Tuhon Leo T. Gaje, Jr.

    Suddenly some of the Instructors of Filipino Martial Arts that came out in the 80’s and 90’s were so impressive like they know everything about Filipino Martial Arts. After they studied two to three years from somebody in the Philippines, they think they are already Masters. Showing some fancy techniques in disarming, blocking, stances, katas with the stick. They came to the United States and started to do some publicity in the Inside Kung Fu and Blackbelt magazines and took some students and started to show techniques like the numbering systems, and the history about the Philippines which a copy of the history books can be bought in any bookstore. They buy some video tapes produced by Dan Inosanto, Doce Pares, Modern Arnis and some half-baked Instructors who can talk a lot and can convinced that their technique can work. My first time in New York City in the early 70's nobody ever heard of Arnis, Eskrima or Kali as a Filipino Martial Arts, until I boldly came out and introduced the Filipino art to a veteran Martial Artist. The first Martial Artist that I had a big respect was Ron Duncan of the Ninjitsu which he was conversant about Japanese weaponry and part of his training was the Judo Stick. We had good friendly sessions and from then I was introduced to the Official Karate because of my first presentation of the art to the New York Police Department which made possible the inclusion of the Filipino Art titled ARNIS THE NEW CRIME FIGHTER which I was on the cover page. There was a Filipino by the name of Mat Marinas, teaching the Arnis Lanada. He had his own students and I had my own students. We separated pathways when I moved to Texas and I started to travel to different States conducting series of seminars. And the first Filipino Kali Summer Camp held at Big Spring, Texas had an attendance of at least 70 people. It was an elegant event because those who graduated in a week long summer training, the Philippine Ambassador, Rodolfo Severino of the Philippine Consulate in Houston, Texas was the guest speaker accompanied by General Kanapi, a military attache from Washington D.C. Philippine Embassy. The years of hard work and patience of travelling from one State to another State conducting seminars, sometimes by car and most of the time by plane every weekend was a tedious process. I conducted several seminars in Los Angeles at Dan Inosanto’s Academy, in Chicago at Degeberg Martial Arts Academy and many more States and counties all over the United States to include Canada. I was in the cover page of the Inside Kung Fu in 1982 and in 1987 I was one of the awardees of the Martial Arts Hall of Fame and 1988 the Karate Hall of Fame. In all those years there were only few Filipino Instructors that were conducting seminars and like Remy Presas of the Modern Arnis, the Doce Pares, Dan Inosanto, and Mat Marinas. The United States was then a virgin territory for the new art which made every martial artist thrilled with curiosity because of the uniqueness of the art applicable to weapon against weapon and empty hands against empty hands. The first exposure of the Filipino Kali full contact tournament was held at the Playboy International Great George, New Jersey sponsored by Alex Steinberg of the Jewish Karate Federation for two consecutive years with an attendance of more than 10,000.

    The summer camp training at the Four Seasons at Pennsylvania with Dan Inosanto, Eddie Jafre of the Pentjak Silat was quite a memorable event with an attendance of more or less forty people. The last summer training I conducted was at Nashville, Tennessee in 1988 with the graduation ceremony held at the Opra Hotel, home of the famous country music singers. And in my years of experience and actual exposure to different martial arts more so to the Filipino Art, I noticed the apparent changes of instructions from the original Filipino Art. For example, the Modern Arnis was teaching stances, blocks, grabbing the sticks, using the belting system, wearing similar karate uniforms. The same with Doce Pares, blocking, katas with the use of the sticks integrating Aikido, Jujitsu, and Judo in the process of disarming while Mat Marinas of the Arnis Lanada was more traditional applying ranging techniques with the use of the knife and the stick which to my observation his knowledge was not adulterated, however in his throws he used the Aikido throw because he was a blackbelt in Aikido. Dan Inosanto’s background coming from Serrada and the Villabrille Kali were more fluid with less impact in disarming but with the interpretation to the empty hands technique. The Pangamut PEKITI-TIRSIA empty hands is based on the blade, and the stick is just a training aid, even in the delivery of the attack the emphasis is the position of the blade. The principle of foot work, the close quarter foot work and the ranging foot work, which combines the close and ranging principle, body mechanics, mobility, agility and versatility, foot, hand, etc are the essential elements of the system. The techniques require that movements must go with the speed of the stick or blade. Speed, timing and power is emphasized and more stress on the ability to deliver a lot of faking attacks which in the process the stick moves into different geometric angular directions. Pekiti-Tirsia emphasize the bridging system, that for every delivery there is recovery and the principle of every thrust there is a slash, for every slash there is a thrust. We do not believe in disarming. Although we teach how to counter disarming, but I discourage my students to dedicate in disarming because that motivates the person to be static, immobile and that will kill him for sure. PEKITI-TIRSIA, hard, serious, kill do training is a must and the training eliminates the boys from the men.. Those who stayed were benefited in learning the true original techniques. This is proven in the first Arnis tournament in the Philippines in 1979 held in Cebu City sponsored by The National Arnis Association of the Philippines. The PEKITI-TIRSIA Fighter in the name of Tom Bisio, a three year and a half student fought against Bonifacio Uy of Doce Pares, an instructor and a blackbelt in short Tom Bisio of the Pekiti-Tirsia defeated Bonifacio Uy of Doce Pares and the grand champion was Tom Bisio. For the first time in several years since 1930, Doce Pares was defeated. Several tournaments the PEKITI-TIRSIA wipe out other styles/system in the United States and in the Philippines. PEKITI-TIRSIA will fight any rules with headgear or no headgear, with live blades or live knife, with rules or no rules. Question, how then you can distinguish your training which some of people are asking in the internet whether they are learning the good or bad arnis, eskrima or Kali? It's not for me to answer but if you guys had experienced training with me or you want to trained under me you will have the right answer. We don’t play around or show techniques that don’t work. We teach techniques that will completely devastate your enemy and kill him for good. So if you want to be a real Kali man and a true thorough breed martial artist you come to the Pekiti-Tirsia. But if you want to play around with blocks or disarming you can go to other styles. Never so few, only the learned will survive. In the Philippines, we put the technique into a real test. It costs lots of efforts to perfect one technique, so if you have any doubt about Filipino Art COME TO WHERE THE FLAVOR IS. COME TO NEGROS, HOME OF THE DOGEATERS!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Uke View Post
    [size=4]if you have any doubt about Filipino Art COME TO WHERE THE FLAVOR IS. COME TO NEGROS, HOME OF THE DOGEATERS!
    Grand Tuhon Leo Gaje scares the crap out of me. Those Pekiti guys don't play games at ALL. I read this last part and it sent shivers up my spine, the image of Rommel stomping in somebodies face ran through my mind. (check out the 55 second mark...can you say SPLAT?)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6J0HH0jZ1c

    Comment


    • #3
      On that note...

      I don't know too much about it...but is there a difference in technique between pekiti tirsia and dekiti tirsia? I know that the art was split...but is there a difference in technique? (I know both GT Leo Gaje and GT Nene Tortal both lay claims to being the rightful heirs of the art...but I'm not clear on the whole story...and I don't know what the connection between PT and Sayoc is either...but there is one...right???)

      Comment


      • #4
        This is an older article, but excellent nonetheless. It shows much of the development through Tuhon's eyes.

        I love the fact that Eric Knauss and Tom Bisio learned Tuhon's art in Jamaica, Queens.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Garland View Post
          On that note...

          I don't know too much about it...but is there a difference in technique between pekiti tirsia and dekiti tirsia? I know that the art was split...but is there a difference in technique? (I know both GT Leo Gaje and GT Nene Tortal both lay claims to being the rightful heirs of the art...but I'm not clear on the whole story...and I don't know what the connection between PT and Sayoc is either...but there is one...right???)
          My experience is with my grandmaster who studied under GT Gaje. I have no association with dekiti tirsia or much info about it. Sayoc was GT Gaje's right hand man for years and was supposed to be the heir apparent, but declined to pursue promoting his family's system instead.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Garland View Post
            Grand Tuhon Leo Gaje scares the crap out of me. Those Pekiti guys don't play games at ALL.
            LOL! I was going to reply saying something about Tuhon scaring me too!

            I just started training with the Pekiti group at my university. I like the fact we were doing knife drills from the first day.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Uke View Post
              This is an older article, but excellent nonetheless. It shows much of the development through Tuhon's eyes.

              I love the fact that Eric Knauss and Tom Bisio learned Tuhon's art in Jamaica, Queens.
              Do Eric Knauss and Tom Bisio teach pekiti?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Limbas View Post
                Do Eric Knauss and Tom Bisio teach pekiti?
                http://dogbrothers.com/wrapper.php?file=bios_knaus.htm

                This little personal history should answer that question re Eric "Top Dog" Knauss.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by aseepish
                  http://dogbrothers.com/wrapper.php?file=bios_knaus.htm

                  This little personal history should answer that question re Eric "Top Dog" Knauss.
                  Nice article, aseepish. You beat me to it. It sure did answer that question.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Belive me, training with Tuhon is a no nonsense affair. Period.

                    Since were focusing on PTK here, this is an article I wrote that is included in my student guide, as well as my blog. It will help give you a sense of training in PTK. Though, if you really want to find out, find a good Pekiti instructor and find out for yourself what differentiates it from the rest.


                    William

                    **************************************************
                    Exploring The Essence Of Pekiti-Tirsia Kali
                    This is an article I wrote with the permission of maginoo-Mandala Tim Waid. Basically what I was attempting to do was modernize some old articles about Pekiti-Tirsia into one new article that reflected PTK as it's taught today. This is not on my web site yet but is included in the student guide. I will be adding this to my site soon.

                    William

                    **********************************************************************************************

                    Exploring the Essence of Pekiti-Tirsia Kali

                    What is it about the Pekiti-Tirsia Kali System that produces such competent and skilled fighters, technicians, and instructors? The Pekiti-Tirsia system of Kali, as taught by Grand Tuhon Leo T. Gaje Jr., combines beauty of motion with practical and effective combat techniques. Yet Pekiti-Tirsia stands out from the myriad of other styles as a complete well-rounded system known for its power, versatility, and effectiveness. From its ranks have come a number of highly skilled instructors and fighters.

                    It is the system’s ingenious structure and training methods, rather than any group of techniques that produces such skilled fighters. The three principle systems of Pekiti-Tirsia; the DOCE METHODOS, Advanced CONTRADAS, and the CONTRA-TIRSIA DUBLA-DOS are designed to teach an orderly progression of skills. Each step adding to the foundation laid down by the previous steps. The essence of that teaching can be found in the maxim: Learn the drill, Master the drill, Dissolve the drill. While the training method itself is unique to Pekiti-Tirsia, its principles can be applied to almost any combative art. Upon close examination, you will see that the stages the student progresses through during his or her training are much the same as those all truly advanced martial artists experience.

                    Pekiti-Tirsia Kali is made up of three distinct stages. The first stage, learning the drill, means learning the basic techniques and body mechanics of the system. Here, the emphasis is on footwork and mobility, so that in the midst of movement, you can change direction at will.

                    Pekiti-Tirsia stresses footwork more than most other Filipino styles. A beginner will spend most of his/her training time on this one aspect, often devoting an hour or more to working on the footwork drills and principles. These drills are executed with/and concentrate on the following attributes:

                    1.) Speed
                    2.) Timing
                    3.) Power
                    4.) Fluidity

                    Focusing on these attributes will help the student develop light and centered stepping, as well as offensive and counter-offensive mobility. Why do Pekiti-Tirsia students spend so much time developing footwork skills? Because, footwork is the key to all fighting strategies. Footwork provides protection, offensive and counter-offensive maneuvering and quartering. Regardless of how you employ your weapon, footwork is vital to survival.

                    Also of vital importance to the beginning Kali students are proper striking mechanics. Students must perform thousands of basic strikes, honing the movements until they can deliver a perfect, powerful strike every time. Striking drills are executed with/and concentrate on the following attributes:

                    1.) Proper chambering/striking positions
                    2.) Blade Orientation
                    3.) Precision in form & movement.
                    4.) Slow execution
                    5.) Fast execution
                    6.) Repetition.

                    The next step in this stage is combining the strikes with footwork. Techniques are synthesized through proper body mechanics and appropriate timing. When combined with tactical applications the student learns to cut his/her opponent’s angle and strike the opponent first, without getting hit in return. It also allows him/her, through application of proper body mechanics and by moving the body as a unit, to deliver blows with awesome power while remaining relaxed and ready to change his/her position in accord with his/her opponent’s movement.

                    Mastering the drill, the second stage, involves the use of two-man drills. These exercises consist of flowing patterns of strikes and counters and are designed in such a way that neither participant ever gets hit. The strikes are taken on the stick (Pasugat) or avoided completely by means of footwork and flows with your opponents attack (Pasunod). The participants are able to practice with full speed, power, and at the advanced stage, with live blades as well, without fear of injuring their training partner. Each drill is designed to teach the practitioner techniques for a given range and different qualities of sensitivity. These combative drills are then combined in a freestyle yet controlled manner through the different ranges of combat. Each drill will move through four progressive stages:

                    1. Combat Drills
                    2. Distance Sparring
                    3. Technical Sparring
                    4. Full-Contact Sparring

                    A quote by Pekiti-Tirsia instructor Tom Bisio defines the purpose of this structure. “All of the drills teach angling, rootedness, and the ability to go from a powerful attack to countering the opponents counter. You have to lock these patterns into your body so the responses are instantaneous; this is not the time for the student to engage in free-flowing drills. At this stage, he still does not have his weapon under complete control and will often try things that are not necessarily workable or practical, wasting a lot of time. The whole point of having a system is to cut a lot of that wasted time, to have you do things that are proven to work. At the advanced level, then it can become your system.”

                    After each drill has become thoroughly mastered, the student begins the process of combining the drills. This is the third and highest stage, that of Dissolving the drill. As you add the drills together, you start to see how the techniques interconnect, and you see the transitions through the different fighting ranges.

                    The advanced level of Pekiti-Tirsia is more than just avoiding an opponents attack and countering. The advanced fighter must anticipate several moves ahead and have a suitable response should the opponent counter his counter. This cannot be done at a “conscious” level. You have trained the techniques and drills to the point that your responses become instinctive so that you unconsciously know where to go. Pekiti-Tirsia has a very large repertoire of techniques, but the principles are very simple.

                    Pekiti-Tirsia instructors believe that the entire process of learning a combative art can be symbolized by the shape of a diamond, or two triangles back to back. At the bottom point, the student starts with nothing. As he/she progresses through the first and second stages, he accumulates what seems to be an immense number of techniques and principles, symbolized by the center of the diamond, its widest point. As he/she advances into the highest stage, however, he/she finds that the thousands of techniques can be reduced to a few principles, so that in the end, he/she has a few principles from which to make any number of techniques.

                    In Pekiti-Tirsia, you first learn the strikes, counters and drills by rote. Then you begin to disassemble and mix the drills and techniques experimenting with what has been learned. At the advanced level, you dissolve the drills and eliminate them completely. At this level, the emphasis is sets of core movements from which you can create an infinite number of techniques.

                    The goal of Pekiti-Tirsia Kali is not to program people to respond in set patterns, but to use these patterns to free the student and produce creative fighters, technicians, and instructors. But creativity must come from discipline, from a firm grounding in correct principles and body mechanics. Only after you have learned and mastered the system, can you dissolve the system. Only after you have gone through all three stages of Pekiti-Tirsia Kali, can you transcend the art.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great article William! Thanks a lot!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree. Good article William!

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