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  • motor skills

    Hello Burt I recently read something about when the body is highly adrenalized as in a fight it is not capable of doing fine motor skills like eye gouging, and other "dirty" tatics.

  • #2
    your almost right.

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    • #3
      re

      Darren Laur is a good source for information on the effects of fear and stress during a fight. This is IMHO the most important of his articles:

      http://members.shaw.ca/tmanifold/anatomy.htm

      And here are the rest:

      http://members.shaw.ca/tmanifold/laur.htm

      Erle Montaigue has done alot of research on psychology in fighting. Pay close attention to the section on the "reptilian brain".

      http://taijiworld.com/download/RV.zip

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      • #4
        Very interesting. Burt whats your opinion?

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        • #5
          Very interesting. Burt what is your opinion?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CKD
            Very interesting. Burt what is your opinion?
            It is a fact that under stress fine motor skills are greatly diminished, along with the ability to think as clearly as when relaxed. I would not call eye gouging a fine motor skill, however. Finger jabs, yes. But grabbing and gouging, no. This is why all of our JKDU basics revolve around simple, instinctual, gross motor movements. For example, the first clinch move is not an under hook, but the Thai Neck Clinch. Very easy to get to and simple to train into a reaction. Most people's instinct is to grab the head in the clinch, and with a little training students can do the neck clinch effectively under stress. Keep your dirty tactics simple and they can work for you. Just don't count on them to be a fight ender. The only way to be sure about finishing a fight is to choke the person unconcious or hit them so hard that you knock them out. (I prefer the choke if at all possible. More humane, less damage to opponent and you.)

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            • #7
              Wow, Great Read ....Mr Brewer you should enjoy the research, it sounds right on and seemed to fit my experience when Mr Murphy showed up.

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              • #8
                The man...

                Originally posted by Burton
                It is a fact that under stress fine motor skills are greatly diminished, along with the ability to think as clearly as when relaxed. ...

                .... The only way to be sure about finishing a fight is to choke the person unconcious or hit them so hard that you knock them out. (I prefer the choke if at all possible. More humane, less damage to opponent and you.)


                I have admired your gong-fu for several years Mr. R. (your JKD ain't bad either ) Thanks for your time and generosity.






                ~ Raymond G.

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                • #9
                  In my humble opinion.

                  Part of training in the Martial Arts is to control one's emotional side, to control fear and the adrenaline rush. To be able to act without the distraction of the bodies natural reactions. A possible similar situation would be where climbers control their fear to pull off moves requiring finesse, balance and aquired technique.

                  Additionally. Drilling should develop and enhance 'motor engrams', if you drill a technique enough eventually it will become your first and most natural response.

                  So in view of this, one of the major rewards of training in martial arts is to be able to perform highly skilfull moves in highly stressful situations.

                  Eye jabs and gouging, amongst other techniques, should be no problem to a well trained and developed martial artists.

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                  • #10
                    Even if you can keep your head cool (control of emotions), you have no control over the diminishing of detail motor skills, as they are not based on emotions but the chemicals working in your body and nervous systems. Just as you cannot tell your hand to stop shaking after drinking a whole can of strong coffee, you cannot tell your hand to stop shaking when your blood is flooded with adrenaline. You can control your emotions (includin fear) so you are able to move instead of freezing out, but you cannot overrun chemistry and physics that work in your bodily systems. Otherwise a trained athlete should be able to tell his heart to stop beating, or tell a cancerous cell to stop dividing. But that can't be done, 'cause it is'nt about controlling your emotions. It's biology and chemistry.

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