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  • Hapkido is a Complete Art - Not an Add On

    This is something I wrote a while back that I thought people here might benefit from.

    Hapkido is a Complete Art - Not an Add On by Alain Burrese

    Often I hear the comment, “Oh, we do Hapkido too,” from someone who trains in TKD or some other art. The problem is not with people who have trained in more than one art, but in that many places teach a few joint locks and hoshinsul techniques from a Hapkido curriculum, and then claim they “do” or “teach” Hapkido too.

    It seems that these people do not realize the fact that Hapkido is a complete martial art, and not something you just “add” onto another style. The schools I trained at in Korea were Hapkido schools, and Hapkido schools only. Hapkido was not a few joint locks added on the side, but the complete martial art that it is, including training in breathing, falling, blocking, striking, kicking, joint locks, throws, forms, weapons, and more. We did Hapkido every class, every day. (And for me, it was two classes a day Monday through Friday and then one on Saturday) To advance through the ranks of Hapkido, you must train in all these areas.

    I do not have anything against a TKD instructor who wants to teach some joint locks or self-defense techniques from Hapkido to help his students be better martial artists and more rounded. But it should be called what it is. “We practice some techniques from Hapkido,” not “We do Hapkido too,” and advertising as a Hapkido school. There really is a big difference in adding a few things on, and training at a Hapkido school where that is all they do.

    Now there are some people that have earned the rank in both arts and can teach both. The programs will be different, and not really interchangeable, since a TKD class and HKD class are different, since they are different arts with different emphasizes. And it is interesting that so many TKD schools add HKD, where I have not seen a HKD school that added TKD. I’m not knocking TKD, but it is sort of interesting, don’t you think? And it is TKD schools that seem to “add HKD on” the most.

    If you are a TKD instructor, and you teach some Hapkido techniques that you have learned in the self-defense or hoshinsul portion of your class, great. Just be sure to let your students know that these are just a portion of what you would learn in a Hapkido program. If you want to learn Hapkido, I recommend a Hapkido program, not just a little added on to something else. The Hapkido program should have its own curriculum and teach all of the things listed above. Note, a school can have a TKD program and a separate Hapkido program, and if you go to both you will find they are quite different, or at least they should be. Or, as I did in Korea , and as you can do elsewhere too, you can go to a school that is Hapkido only. The main thing is to realize that Hapkido is a complete art and not just the addition of a couple joint locks and throws to something else.

    Yours in Training,
    Alain

    www.burrese.com
    www.aikiproductions.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by Alain View Post
    This is something I wrote a while back that I thought people here might benefit from.

    Hapkido is a Complete Art - Not an Add On by Alain Burrese

    Often I hear the comment, “Oh, we do Hapkido too,” from someone who trains in TKD or some other art. The problem is not with people who have trained in more than one art, but in that many places teach a few joint locks and hoshinsul techniques from a Hapkido curriculum, and then claim they “do” or “teach” Hapkido too.

    It seems that these people do not realize the fact that Hapkido is a complete martial art, and not something you just “add” onto another style. The schools I trained at in Korea were Hapkido schools, and Hapkido schools only. Hapkido was not a few joint locks added on the side, but the complete martial art that it is, including training in breathing, falling, blocking, striking, kicking, joint locks, throws, forms, weapons, and more. We did Hapkido every class, every day. (And for me, it was two classes a day Monday through Friday and then one on Saturday) To advance through the ranks of Hapkido, you must train in all these areas.

    I do not have anything against a TKD instructor who wants to teach some joint locks or self-defense techniques from Hapkido to help his students be better martial artists and more rounded. But it should be called what it is. “We practice some techniques from Hapkido,” not “We do Hapkido too,” and advertising as a Hapkido school. There really is a big difference in adding a few things on, and training at a Hapkido school where that is all they do.

    Now there are some people that have earned the rank in both arts and can teach both. The programs will be different, and not really interchangeable, since a TKD class and HKD class are different, since they are different arts with different emphasizes. And it is interesting that so many TKD schools add HKD, where I have not seen a HKD school that added TKD. I’m not knocking TKD, but it is sort of interesting, don’t you think? And it is TKD schools that seem to “add HKD on” the most.

    If you are a TKD instructor, and you teach some Hapkido techniques that you have learned in the self-defense or hoshinsul portion of your class, great. Just be sure to let your students know that these are just a portion of what you would learn in a Hapkido program. If you want to learn Hapkido, I recommend a Hapkido program, not just a little added on to something else. The Hapkido program should have its own curriculum and teach all of the things listed above. Note, a school can have a TKD program and a separate Hapkido program, and if you go to both you will find they are quite different, or at least they should be. Or, as I did in Korea , and as you can do elsewhere too, you can go to a school that is Hapkido only. The main thing is to realize that Hapkido is a complete art and not just the addition of a couple joint locks and throws to something else.

    Yours in Training,
    Alain

    www.burrese.com
    www.aikiproductions.com




    Sounds like a bitchfest to me. This idea that you have of what a complete martial art is seems to be quite blurred. The fact is that in principle there could be a martial art that is complete but you couldn't train in all factors of it. So it includes strikes, jointlocks etc, that by no means should suggest that you could become greatly skilled in all of those. Thats why arts that concentrate on certain factors, particially ranges are best recognised as being sound arts. A 'complete' art tends to be a mash of bits of peices that never really covers it competently. Why do you think MMA go to Muay Thai for striking, BJJ for ground work, Judo or Wrestling for takedowns?

    It shouldn't be an offense that arts or individuals want to add Hapkido techniques to its training it should be flattering, at least it shows that people see some use in these techniques and perhaps consider your art as the creme de la creme of that area.

    'And it is interesting that so many TKD schools add HKD, where I have not seen a HKD school that added TKD. I’m not knocking TKD, but it is sort of interesting, don’t you think? And it is TKD schools that seem to “add HKD on” the most.' - obviously you are otherwise you wouldn't have mentioned it.... an thats all i can be bothered to type right now.

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    • #3
      Well in TKD where i train, we do have some lessons from self-defense, but its self defense learning for a situation that could happen outside, now if the move is from hapkido or somewhere else, he dosent say, he just teaches us how to do it right, not from where it was taken...

      Comment


      • #4
        Couple of ideas to throw out here.

        Hapkido does not borrow from TKD because there is nothing much there we do not already have. TKD is a striking art only, that is why they "borrow" from our art.

        Second, the MMA people always train in the art du jour. Whatever seems to be working on the UFC or Pride on that day, they will rush out and train in that. Nothing really new here, it has been done for years.

        Fact is, if you have trained in a traditional art for a long time, you tend to stick with what you like. Others train in different arts because they either get bored with one or just don't have the mentality to stick with it. They have the modern idea of "I want it all."

        Just my opinion...

        Comment


        • #5
          I train in Hapkido and MT. Hapkido is a great well rounded style if taught correctly and I love it. However there is nothing new under the sun despite what many people will try and sell you in the MA's.

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