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  • Hmmmm

    While TC may be a fraud and an annoyance some people on this board take it to an extreme. Let's investigate why.

    Draw your own conclusions.

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    How the Internet Makes Some People Behave Like Jerks

    by B Nelson, Jun 19, 2008
    There are eight basic reasons why nice people behave meanly when on-line, read about the causes of this common problem.

    The on-line world can be particularly cruel and harsh. Typically people are far more sympathetic to people they see and meet in real like than they are to on-line acquaintances. For some reason people feel a need to belittle, or attack others on the Internet as though every interaction is a game where points are given to the sole survivor. People who are genuinely nice in "real life" are ruthless, on-line killers, posting nasty script in blogs or forums.

    I think I know why it is. It is not one thing, it is the combination of several things and a lack of understanding that the person on the other end is real, and has feelings, just as much as we do.

    1.
    Text is Harsh
    For the most part anything we say on-line is going to be harsher than said in a conversation where a tone can soften a negative comment. Font is crisp, black on white, cut and dry. CAPS ARE YELLING, so are even harsher. Basically anything said in type is more formal, more stern, and therefore taken harder, to some this may seem like a threat that they have to fight against.
    2.
    Gamer Mentality
    I gotta win. Every conversation is a challenge, every chat room is a show of wit, or who can get the most said, or who can dominate, who can be the last one standing. This mentality has created a whole personality type, that of the chat room Flamer. Every thing on-line is a contest. They read things and just hope there is a place at the bottom so they can make a comment, so eager to ensure they get the last word in everything.
    3.
    Words cannot hurt me
    They fight with venom in text. Knowing that nothing the other person can say will ever harm them physically. Strangers in an on-line assault, their only weapons are words, insults, and rude comments. They call each other names without any concern.
    4.
    No Eyes
    It is easier to insult somebody when you are not face to face, live, with that person. We tend to feel a bit more sympathy to people we can see, hear, or touch. It is easier to break up with a partner over the phone, even easier over the Internet. If you do not have to look into somebodies eyes, to see the pain of the words you inflict, it is so much easier.
    5.
    No Consequence
    In real life, if you insult somebody the way some on-line insults go, your group of friends would shrink, as few people, other than similar bullies, would hang out with you, people would shun you, or call you to task for your negativity.
    6.
    Easy
    Many sites offer people to either give a positive or negative response, a "thumbs up" or a "thumbs down". Since you are neither reward or punished for being nice or mean, it is easy to be negative to another person.
    7.
    Don't Look Back
    Often times a person posts an insult and never checks back to see if the person they insulted responded, or they insult somebody, then "block" them from replying.
    8.
    Anonymity
    This is a big one. When you are on-line you can be anyone. You can be Suzy123 in a chat room, and Big Matt in a forum, qwerty when posting a comment, and Ilovekittens when posting a blog. You can swear, belittle, insult, or whatever, and it never ever touches who you really are. Or does it?

    When you insult others on-line you create a negative world, a world were everyone feels they have to be defensive. It might only be an on-line world, but people live beyond that world and are affected by what is said to them, even if it is only in hard, sterile, text. Nothing has been improved by being negative only for the sake of being negative.

    True, nobody is going to like everything, and not everything is going to be liked, but why hurt somebody by being negative? It is better to show compassion to another persons efforts and criticize them honestly. When a person asks "Do you like this picture of me?" rather than typing in "Man you are some kinda ugly, did you come out of a toilet for that photo?" it is just as easy to write "Sorry you are not my type, the photo is too dark also.".

    We have the power to make the real world better, we have the power to make the on-line world better. Not everything is a game or a challenge. Not everything is a foe to be fought.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------


    A bill introduced to Congress after a tragic case of cyberbullying led to a young teenager's suicide

    Cyberbullying is the deliberate use of electronic communication to harass, intimidate, embarrass or demean others. While many schools have taken initiative to devise their own policies against bullying, and some forward-thinking schools specifically include the topic of cyberbullying within their policies, transgressions related to bullying have yet to be defined as crimes punishable through the law enforcement community.

    In 2008, however, Representatives Linda Sanchez (D-CA) and Kenny Hulshof (R-MO) introduced the Megan Meier Cyberbullying Prevention Act. If passed, cyberbullying would be a federal offense, so that any person to "transmit in interstate or foreign commerce any communication, with the intent to coerce, intimidate, harass or cause substantial emotional distress to a person, using electronic means to support severe, repeated, and hostile behavior, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than two years, or both."

    The bill became introduced to Congress after the tragic suicide of a 13 year-old girl, Megan Meier, from Missouri. Over the social networking site MySpace, Meier was befriended and romanced online by a boy named Josh Evans, who later cruelly rejected her in an act that directly influenced Meier to hang herself in her bedroom. "Josh Evans" was later discovered to be a neighbor and mother of a former friend, along with a handful of co-conspirators, who falsely created the MySpace account for the sole purpose of duping the young teenager. With no law against cyberbullying in existence, Meier's offender was found in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, a law against hacking, because she used a protected computer to obtain information that caused emotional distress.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Megan Meier Cyberbullying Prevention Act (Introduced in House)

    HR 6123 IH

    110th CONGRESS

    2d Session

    H. R. 6123

    To amend title 18, United States Code, with respect to cyberbullying.

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

    May 22, 2008

    Ms. LINDA T. SANCHEZ of California (for herself and Mr. HULSHOF) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

    A BILL

    To amend title 18, United States Code, with respect to cyberbullying.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

    SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the `Megan Meier Cyberbullying Prevention Act'.

    SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

    Congress finds the following:

    (1) Four out of five of United States children aged 2 to 17 live in a home where either they or their parents access the Internet.

    (2) Youth who create Internet content and use social networking sites are more likely to be targets of cyberbullying.

    (3) Electronic communications provide anonymity to the perpetrator and the potential for widespread public distribution, potentially making them severely dangerous and cruel to youth.

    (4) Online victimizations are associated with emotional distress and other psychological problems, including depression.

    (5) Cyberbullying can cause psychological harm, including depression; negatively impact academic performance, safety, and the well-being of children in school; force children to change schools; and in some cases lead to extreme violent behavior, including murder and suicide.

    (6) Sixty percent of mental health professionals who responded to the Survey of Internet Mental Health Issues report having treated at least one patient with a problematic Internet experience in the previous five years; 54 percent of these clients were 18 years of age or younger.

    SEC. 3. CYBERBULLYING.

    (a) In General- Chapter 41 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

    `Sec. 881. Cyberbullying

    `(a) Whoever transmits in interstate or foreign commerce any communication, with the intent to coerce, intimidate, harass, or cause substantial emotional distress to a person, using electronic means to support severe, repeated, and hostile behavior, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than two years, or both.

    `(b) As used in this section--

    `(1) the term `communication' means the electronic transmission, between or among points specified by the user, of information of the user's choosing, without change in the form or content of the information as sent and received; and

    `(2) the term `electronic means' means any equipment dependent on electrical power to access an information service, including email, instant messaging, blogs, websites, telephones, and text messages.'.

    (b) Clerical Amendment- The table of sections at the beginning of chapter 41 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new item:

    `881. Cyberbullying.'.

  • #2
    Think the martial arts forums are the best place to work on it? Maybe we should be exempt? LOL Kinda sad when pretend "crimes" can be prosecuted in the real world...

    It's all virtual KOTF...

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Tant01 View Post
      Kinda sad when pretend "crimes" can be prosecuted in the real world...

      It's all virtual KOTF...

      Well with that kind of attitude it's no wonder these people run rampant on the internet.

      Kinda sad how since everybody at some time in their life has bullied others, they just want to ignore it.

      Some things are acceptable, but some people take things too far.

      Racism is a type of bulling so is sexism. It may not involve physical confrontation just verbal but i see no difference.

      Apparently we differ on this point. I gnoring obviously doesn't make it go away.

      Comment


      • #4
        it's starts at home and snowballs.

        It really doesn't stay virtual. These habits learned young follow people. it creates these problems.

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        Bully in the Office
        By Joy D. Russell
        VARBusiness Magazine
        March 5, 2001

        Horrifying, bloody incidents in the workplace earn bold, front-page headlines. Such tragic events are not senseless and unpredictable acts of violence, some experts say. They are unresolved conflicts that have been allowed to brew over time until an employee explodes. The recipe for disaster: Take the ridiculous workload of IT professionals combined with a shortage of qualified workers and mix with unresponsive or bullying bosses.

        "The high-tech industry, especially, has a lot of the characteristics of high-risk factors for violence," says Richard Denenberg, co-author of the book, The Violence-Prone Workplace. "Tight deadlines, a highly competitive atmosphere and being worried that your company might go out of business tomorrow are the very things causing high stress for technology workers," he says. Workplace stress is found in virtually every sector and is not a new issue. But it seems to become a notable problem only after a shooting, stabbing or other violent act has occurred.

        Denenberg cited a 1999 study by Yale University's School of Management, which surveyed workers throughout the country. When asked, "How often are you angry at work?" more than 20 percent of respondents answered, "All the time." That seed of dissatisfaction often grows as time passes. "People are afraid to confront the person directly. They tip-toe around him or her, and it makes their work life unpleasant," Denenberg says.

        The Belly of the Beast

        An underlying force is destroying work environments every day. "The more pervasive problem is this lurking noncivility, intimidation and insecurity, which greatly affects the workplace," says David Yamada, professor of law specializing in labor and employment issues at Suffolk University Law School in Boston. A workplace bully, Yamada says, is someone who repeatedly mistreats either a co-worker or a subordinate, often in subtle ways.

        Tim Brandenburg, a former network administrator at a North Carolina steel company, escaped to the parking lot for walks or climbed the stairway so he could relieve stress. After a scant three months, Brandenburg quit his high-paying job. That happened two years ago, but Brandenburg distinctly remembers it was the first time in his career that he left a job under such circumstances.

        Stress from a heavy workload wasn't entirely to blame in Brandenburg's case. It was the people he had to work with and take orders from--sometimes for 15 hours a day.

        "I remember losing sleep over it," says Brandenburg, 32. "A co-worker really wanted my job and she would do things like change the settings on computers while I wasn't in the office. I got blamed for things not working. I told my boss about it, but he didn't do anything to resolve it." An out-of-control vice president at the company also tried to intimidate Brandenburg and others with adolescent tactics. "He would stand up on his desk and yell, 'I'm just getting itchy to fire somebody!' He had a terrible temper, and everybody that was under him was just paranoid."

        Dr. Gary Namie, a social organizational psychologist and president of the Campaign Against Workplace Bullying, says a bullying boss can cause people to commit violent acts at work. Namie, who co-authored the recently published book, The Bully At Work, says most company managers aware of potentially violent situations do little to diffuse them. Instead, managers who use bullying techniques toward their employees are often rewarded by top managers for having a strict management style.

        "It's really critical to understand this pressure to produce is investor-driven," Namie says. Companies "need to turn around profits really quickly. Truth be told, we should be concerned with psychological violence that happens in the workplace every day. Everybody knows it's happening, but nobody does anything about it."

        A Trail of Tragedy

        After years of mistreatment, a state agency worker finally lost it, Namie recalls in his book. The man had returned to work after recuperating from a heart attack, reportedly induced by his manager, who greeted him in the parking lot and provoked him before he even entered the building. The employee, who has been described as gentle and caring, left in his car. He returned with a gun, killed his manager, and then himself. Co-workers considered the incident a tragedy only because of the suicide. Most people who become victims of bullies, as the state worker did, will more likely commit suicide rather than kill the bully, according to Namie.

        After the incident in December at Edgewater Technology, the company released a statement saying McDermott's actions "apparently stem from occurrences in his personal life. There was no way to anticipate his actions or any apparent reason to restrict his access to the building." But McDermott reportedly had an outburst over the issue regarding his wages the week before the shootings.

        "People don't just snap out of the clear-blue sky," says Lewis Maltby, president of the National Work Rights Institute in Princeton, N.J., an organization that spun off from the ACLU.

        "People don't normally go from happy to dissatisfied right away," Maltby says. "They get more and more unhappy, and then they go over the edge. But there are always signs that a person is starting to unravel." A sign could be subtle, such as a person becoming more reserved or projecting aggressive behavior that is out of character for the individual, he says.

        Preventing the Violence

        Nearly 7,600 workers were victims of homicide in the workplace between 1980 and 1989, according to available data from the National Traumatic Occupational Facilities Surveillance System. Eighty percent of the victims were males, although homicide was the leading cause of occupational death for women. Companies can do something to reduce the risk of violence while preserving their most valuable assets--their employees. Denenberg, co-director of Workplace Solutions, a nonprofit organization that creates violence-prevention programs for companies, notes that acknowledging the potential for violence in any workplace is the first step for companies. "Typically, you can increase understanding [through] role-playing situations in the workplace where an employee, let's say, is having problems with a manager," Denenberg says.

        Randomly selected high-tech companies chosen by VARBusiness were reluctant to discuss whether they had any policy to address workplace violence. But some are talking about the subject with their workers. Hewlett-Packard, for example, distributes a pamphlet to its employees on its violence-prevention program.

        "The security of HP employees is vital," the pamphlet states. "Violent threats or acts affecting HP or occurring on HP property will not be tolerated." If trouble arises, HP employees are asked to fill out and sign an incident report form.

        In reality, though, most people tend to look the other way. "It's a hell of a lot easier just to ignore the person because you don't want to be the one to tell HR, 'Listen, I think this guy's about to crack.' We don't trust our judgment," Yamada says.

        Companies should also be concerned about mistreated workers sabotaging their systems. Respondents to a 1998 survey by the Computer Security Institute in San Francisco, an association of information security professionals, found computer attacks by their own employees were a serious threat. As cited in Namie's book, the survey found 70 percent of those who were authorized to use their companies' networks reported one to five incidents originated inside the company that year. Companies that could place a dollar amount on such damage reported an average annual total of nearly $137 million in losses.

        Correcting Old Ways

        There is a common management belief that to be productive, workers must be cracked with a whip, Maltby says. "You can be a tough boss, but respect your employees," Maltby says. "Meanness becomes a desire to be valued, and that's crazy. How can a company say people are their most valuable asset, and then be mean to them?"

        Yamada and Namie are working on introducing legislation, first in California, to provide legal redress for targets of workplace bullying, abuse and harassment, without regard to protected class status. "Bullying is the sexual harassment of 20 years ago; everybody knows about it, but nobody wants to admit it," Maltby says.

        Needless to say, not all managers are bullies. And once-abused IT professionals like Brandenburg are beginning to see that all of corporate America is not cruel. Today, Brandenburg works full time as a call analyst for a large software company in North Carolina and part time as a network administrator for an insurance company.

        "My managers, for the most part, are easy-going," Brandenburg says. "But the less they yell in my ear, the more time I have to get the job done."

        Comment


        • #5
          There is a difference between so-called "cyber bullying" and harassment in the workplace or being hounded by somebody in your life or prevented from success based on race or sex.

          That law came into place because some ignorant idiot preteen girl and their sadistic mother decided to play a ruse on a rival at school and create a love interest in their life and then crush her fragile little world by revoking that. That is psychological torture and manipulation at a very calculated and refined scale...not some douchebag being a douchebag on the internet or some prick being confrontational or rude.

          Certainly the mother and daughter pair need to be punished for the planned manipulation of another person's emotions driving them ultimately to suicide...but some rowdy or rude flammer or troll isn't doing any real damage...and if they are, buddy, you need to harden the fvk up.

          People these days can't stand up to criticism, confrontation, or conflicting points of view. Hopefully these people will fail to procreate and their weak skin trait will cease to proliferate.

          Comment


          • #6
            There is a definitive difference between having diffrent points of view, and just being an asshole for the sake of being one.


            I personally have learned to ignore the clowns. However it's funny to see people defend ignorance and ill behavior over common courtesy.

            Yes people these days don't take criticism lightly I'll agree. Propagating this anonymous shit talking attitude however is a more deep seated physcologial problem.

            People who feel the need to troll, and flame are expressing inner problems that they have.

            This may lead to more people acting out their inner problems through violence.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kingoftheforest View Post
              People who feel the need to troll, and flame are expressing inner problems that they have.

              This may lead to more people acting out their inner problems through violence.
              ...I don't see the correlation between these two. In fact I think that the overall mentality of violence and the increase of violent crimes is about a number of other variables, and any possible connection between what somebody writes on twitter or facebook is completely irrelevant.
              As a small aside...people that snap and end up climbing towers or...breaking into immigration offices and firing 98 rounds in just over a minute from two hand guns (according to the local paper...jesus h. christ)...tend to be lifelong victims of bullying, either on an individual or social level...(what would you call gang violence, or mob violence.)

              I whole heartedly agree with the diathesis stress model for agression and violence...and I also believe that the theory proported by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman concerning the factors allowing an individual to kill and the increase in violence is right on target, so to speak.

              http://www.killology.com/images/mangraphic.jpg

              All of the institutions in our society tell us it is okay to kill. Everything around us enables violence. Especially the media...and sadly while looking up charts and pictures for illustration (found a bunch of cool less topic related graphs and stuff I'm putting at the bottom of the post) I stumbled across a website that is focused on selling faux rape, snuff, and necrophilic films...on google (my search phrase was "on killing" "chart" or "table")...which I will be reporting to as many internet watching govenment agencies, women's rights organizations, and anything else I can think of. The cat's out of the bag. Our society is beyond reigning back at this point with the unreal access people have to media via the internet...we are breeding psuedo-sociopaths. The problem is beyond first person shooter games and violent television. So...the internet is a problem...trollers and flamers just aren't it (they generally aren't the killing type).



              http://www.sdtactics.com.au/images/T...e%20Repeat.gif
              http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/.../cummings1.jpg
              http://www.killology.com/images/heartrate2.jpg

              Comment


              • #8
                Is there a doctor in the house?

                Originally posted by kingoftheforest View Post
                There is a definitive difference between having diffrent points of view, and just being an asshole for the sake of being one.


                I personally have learned to ignore the clowns. However it's funny to see people defend ignorance and ill behavior over common courtesy.

                Yes people these days don't take criticism lightly I'll agree. Propagating this anonymous shit talking attitude however is a more deep seated physcologial problem.

                People who feel the need to troll, and flame are expressing inner problems that they have.

                This may lead to more people acting out their inner problems through violence.


                Is this your way of crying out for help?

                Comment

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