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The Advantages and Disadvantages of Blocking and Striking with The Same Limb for Mart

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  • Garland
    replied
    left hook.

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  • KirkhamsEbooks.
    replied
    I get the last one now I think I've done that in boxing. Little parry then swivel of the elbow turning it into a front cross. Near the top did you mean right hook or left hook?

    I'd ask my wife about the Tagalog but she's Illacano

    Rick

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  • Garland
    replied
    Several different combinations.

    One is pretty typical of muay thai, and I've seen other practitioners use it too, namely in kyokushin karate and in kenpo karate...you block a low or mid-line kick with your shin by bringing it up, checking it, and then using that same checking leg to strike back.

    The other one could be exemplified in covering an attackers left hook(with the right arm), coming back with a left hook of your own. The cover set up your body mechanics to fire back.

    These two are my preferred methods.

    The other coutners were things like...oh, a hard inside to outside block in kenpo or tae kwon do followed by turning the arm over and going for the eye gouge or just sending a shuto into the neck. Really traditional stuff, not really to my cup of tea, but something I've had a teensie weensie bit of exposure to.

    The last method was the da cup...I'm trying the get it right phonetically because I have no idea how it's spelled, it's a tagalog word, essentially you cup the weapon out of the way. Kind of like a boxers parry, but you lightly "toss" it out of the line it enters on...from here I like to use the same hand I do this with to throw a long hook...you can also just fire something that goes on a linear line too...but the hook (a long leading one, not like a true blue hook...the angle is much more obtuse and almost linear) is more natural for the sport context what I use it for.

    It's just changing the direction of the hand in flight, like letting somebody parry your jab and turning it to a hook when they add that energy to it...like a jua sao or "running hand" in wing chun.
    Last edited by Garland; 10-24-2009, 12:34 AM.

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  • KirkhamsEbooks.
    replied
    I'm afraid I'm having trouble picturing the combo

    Rick

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  • Garland
    replied
    I often shield kicks and fire back with the same leg when practicing muay thai, and will do straight finger thrusts or shuto type strikes if I do hard style blocks with the same hand if I'm messing about with those things...

    Usually I prefer and find the boxing method of covering and returning back with the opposite site set up with good, powerful body mechanics to throw a powerful punch. Or just straight up cutting an angle and countering.

    But...does parrying a cross with the left in a scooping manner (da cup?) and returning with a long lead hook a'la panatukan count as blocking and hitting with the same limb?

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  • The Advantages and Disadvantages of Blocking and Striking with The Same Limb for Mart

    The Advantages and Disadvantages of Blocking and Striking with The Same Limb for Martial Arts and Self-Defense Practitioners

    by Sensei J. Richard Kirkham B.Sc.

    Blocking and striking with the same leg or arm? What happened to the other weapons we carry as part of our bodies everyday? I

    have to tell you though I've had some good success with this method of counter-attack, but it does have it's disadvantages as

    well....


    The Advantages and Disadvantages of Blocking and Striking with The Same Limb
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