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  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by wsdddoa012 View Post
    dodgeduckdodge:

    Yes I know the WTF is a member of the International Olympic Committee. But I was always under the impression that the WTF is also associated with the Kukkiwon. Which does issue out dan certificates, training forms and so forth. Since many instructors and students for that matter seem to associate themselves with either the WTF or ITF I figured the Kukkiwon and WTF were in alliance (so to speak) with eachother therefore making it a business association.
    There is a relationship of recognition between the WTF and the Kukkiwon, you are correct. But it is not like you and others think. Example, you can search the web and find hundreds of websites where instructors will state they have the following:

    - WTF certified black belt
    - member school of the WTF
    - instructor is a member of the WTF
    - we do WTF style
    - we teach WTF Tae Kwon Do

    It's really funny because it's all bull-------- The sad part is that many of these instructors actually believe it. Then others believe it too.

    Who started all this nonsense?????

    It's like saying because I have a California drivers license that I am certified by the US Government, a member of the US Government, etc.

    The state of martial arts in the USA is sad.............

    Alcohol

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  • wsdddoa012
    replied
    response

    dodgeduckdodge:

    Yes I know the WTF is a member of the International Olympic Committee. But I was always under the impression that the WTF is also associated with the Kukkiwon. Which does issue out dan certificates, training forms and so forth. Since many instructors and students for that matter seem to associate themselves with either the WTF or ITF I figured the Kukkiwon and WTF were in alliance (so to speak) with eachother therefore making it a business association.

    Leave a comment:


  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    Sorry dude, just symantics.
    I know, sometimes facts can sound that way.

    Alcohol

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  • JStinson
    replied
    Originally posted by dodgeduckdodge View Post
    No one can belong to the WTF. That's fact. Also, I have not been a member of the USTU since 2001. I am a Kukkiwon Dan holder however, but that does not make me a member of the WTF, regardless of what you may think.

    If "instructors" told you Taekwondo stances came from Taekkyon, they have been mis-informed. I know, I practice Taekkyon, and learn it directly from the highest senior of Taekkyon in Korea. We discuss these issues about the relationship between Taekwondo and Taekkyon on many occasions.


    Alcohol
    Sorry dude, just symantics.

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  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    Instructors...

    People that have knowledge of the art I am asking about. Not to say books are not a valuable asset, I just don't trust all books. And before it is said, I know people can be just as false as books, my choice. Internet is an even worse choice in my opinion, anyone can write whatever they want.

    From what I see, you belong to the WTF and have your own opinion, that is fine. It just is not what I choose to believe. So, agree to disagree.
    No one can belong to the WTF. That's fact. Also, I have not been a member of the USTU since 2001. I am a Kukkiwon Dan holder however, but that does not make me a member of the WTF, regardless of what you may think.

    If "instructors" told you Taekwondo stances came from Taekkyon, they have been mis-informed. I know, I practice Taekkyon, and learn it directly from the highest senior of Taekkyon in Korea. We discuss these issues about the relationship between Taekwondo and Taekkyon on many occasions.

    I like to get my information from various sources. As for books, I consider the author. Example: books by the Kukkiwon and Kwan founders are all good choices for Taekwondo.

    Just about every other book on Taekwondo is total garbage, written by men who want to make a name from themselves, because getting published is their only hope of being "known".

    But nothing beats talking personally to the men who were there all along, from the beginning of Taekwondo, to the present. They are my best source of information.

    Alcohol

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  • JStinson
    replied
    Originally posted by dodgeduckdodge View Post
    Really, so where do you get your information from then?

    Let's take this for example; "The upright stances of the Taegeuk forms were intriduced to complement the fighting style derived from the Taekyon background."

    Where did you get this from?

    Alcohol
    Instructors...

    People that have knowledge of the art I am asking about. Not to say books are not a valuable asset, I just don't trust all books. And before it is said, I know people can be just as false as books, my choice. Internet is an even worse choice in my opinion, anyone can write whatever they want.

    From what I see, you belong to the WTF and have your own opinion, that is fine. It just is not what I choose to believe. So, agree to disagree.

    Leave a comment:


  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    Sorry, I don't get information from books. Too much "lost in translation" for me. As for video, I have seen some historical video of him, his stances look nothing like the new style, similar, maybe, but so does some stances from other unrelated arts.
    Really, so where do you get your information from then?

    Let's take this for example; "The upright stances of the Taegeuk forms were intriduced to complement the fighting style derived from the Taekyon background."

    Where did you get this from?

    Alcohol
    Last edited by dodgeduckdodge; 08-09-2007, 05:23 PM. Reason: add

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  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by wsdddoa012 View Post
    Has the mixing of both ITF and WTF forms every taken place? would the ITF or WTF allow a tkd instructor to mix forms from both organizations?
    Mike, the WTF could care less. You have the wrong idea about what the WTF is. Let me explain a few things.

    First off, the ITF and the WTF are very different administratively. The ITF sets curriculum standards and requirements for individual, instructor and school membership.

    As for the WTF:

    - no person can be a member of the WTF
    - only one national taekwondo association in each nation can be a member of the WTF
    - the WTF itself is a member of the International Olympic Committee
    - the WTF is nothing more than a tournament committee, they only run tournaments and nothing else.
    - they don't issue Dan (black belt) certificates
    - they did not create any forms
    - they did not create a sparring style
    - they don't have a curriculum
    - they don't have a color, or black belt system
    - they do however choose what they feel is authentic taekwondo associations and what type of sparring and poomsae will be judged at their events.

    As for the ITF:
    - they set curriculum
    -they issued Dan and instructor certificates
    - they do not allow non ITF school students to enter their championships
    - they run tournaments
    - they are a private organization, meaning they are a business, just like the local muffler shop.

    Hope that helps

    Alcohol

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  • GranFire
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    Sure it is good for the brain, so is solitaire. Fact is that most people do not like doing a form, let alone three of them per level. I have been teaching for 20 years now and have seen only a handful of people that actually like forms. Most quit because they get frustrated with learning them. Yes, I know there are exceptions, just going by what I have seen. Plus, most people memorize them for the next test and either forget them completly or can't do them for crap when asked to do them. Then there is the issue of asking the student what certain moves are used for and they have no idea.

    Don't get me wrong, I enjoy them and liked teaching them, but by far most people dont'


    I teach a lot of kids. I try to make it clear to them that forms are not a means in it self, but serve a purpose: Practice the full range of moves you would otherwise not be able to do, say while sparring, and explain to the best of my ability what the move they are doing is supposed to accomplish. Seems to work OK. of course, there are the sparrers, and there are those that just work real hard at all parts of it. I like forms... though there are a couple I can't get on a friendly base with!

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  • JStinson
    replied
    Originally posted by GranFire View Post
    And since Choi is about reproach....


    I don't think forms is for naught, even in variation. Even in our micro organized place (national lvl that is) there are still great variations in the forms, though the rule states "as seen on DVD".

    As and act of learning I don't mind change and new forms. A leading neurologist has proven that by doing things our body is not accustomed to we form new connections in our brains, even as adults (while traditionally it's said these developments are halted at age three or so) and I am working out with a woman who is proof for that.

    But balancing two sets of forms, or more than one form per rank (depending on how much time in rank you will have) is a mental work out.


    And for the instructors...it does not matter if you add a new set to your curriculum or learn a completely new set. You will have to do the mental push up and learn one new set, well enough to teach to your students. take your Vitamins, get plenty of rest...it's a toughy!
    Sure it is good for the brain, so is solitaire. Fact is that most people do not like doing a form, let alone three of them per level. I have been teaching for 20 years now and have seen only a handful of people that actually like forms. Most quit because they get frustrated with learning them. Yes, I know there are exceptions, just going by what I have seen. Plus, most people memorize them for the next test and either forget them completly or can't do them for crap when asked to do them. Then there is the issue of asking the student what certain moves are used for and they have no idea.

    Don't get me wrong, I enjoy them and liked teaching them, but by far most people dont'

    Leave a comment:


  • JStinson
    replied
    Originally posted by dodgeduckdodge View Post
    Get Gichin Funakoshi's book "To-Te Jitsu" ISBN 0-920129-22-6, published in 1922. Unlike Funakoshi Sensei's later work Karate-Do Kyohan, in To-Te Jitsu, he himself is pictured demonstrating the kata. Almost all the many photo's of Funakoshi Sensei's technique show him in high and narrow stances.

    This is also evident in all of the original Okinawan masters films and books. Kenwa Mabuni, Kanken Toyama, Shimabuku and more.

    Also, search Youtube for video of Funakoshi Sensei performing the kata. It is amazing to see. When you see it, consider this; You are watching your teachers, teachers, teachers, teacher (or more!)

    If you have trouble locating the book, or videos, let me know, I will assist you.

    Oh, by the way, the so-called walking stances found in the first three Taegeuk Poomsae have nothing to do with Kyorugi Jasae (sparring stance). This issue was brought up at the Kukkiwon Instructors Course. The Sabum stated there was no such relation, nor intention.

    Alcohol
    Sorry, I don't get information from books. Too much "lost in translation" for me. As for video, I have seen some historical video of him, his stances look nothing like the new style, similar, maybe, but so does some stances from other unrelated arts.

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  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    OK, let me see if I have this straight. The Taegeuk forms with there walking stances look like the Okinawan forms??? The Okinawan forms I have seen and done had longer stances than the Chang Han forms. The upright stances of the Taegeuk forms were intriduced to complement the fighting style derived from the Taekyon background.
    Oh, one more thing!

    There are no stances, or fighting techniques of Taekwondo that were derived from Taekkyon. How do I know?

    - I am currently one of only a few American practitioners of Taekkyon.
    - Taekkyon "stance" and special stepping is a contradiction to the goals of Taekwondo techniques and are completely unrelated.
    - Actually is is wrong to say Taekkyon even has a stance, it has movement.
    - Several Kwan leaders have personally told me there is no relation between the two.
    - The only direct influence of Taekkyon can be found in the current version of Koryo. And those few techniques are mutated and not applicable to their original technique and use in Taekkyon.

    Alcohol

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  • eXcessiveForce
    replied
    Originally posted by wsdddoa012 View Post
    OK hypothetical.... What would happen if someone did decide to teach both ITF and WTF forms in the same cirriculum?.. Seeing how they dont like mixing up things.


    And yes I did know that dodgeduckdodge..
    There was a Universal Taekwondo around for awhile that did teach both sets of forms and a third set if I remember correctly. I haven't seen anything out of them in 10 years though

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  • dodgeduckdodge
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    OK, let me see if I have this straight. The Taegeuk forms with there walking stances look like the Okinawan forms??? The Okinawan forms I have seen and done had longer stances than the Chang Han forms. The upright stances of the Taegeuk forms were intriduced to complement the fighting style derived from the Taekyon background.
    Get Gichin Funakoshi's book "To-Te Jitsu" ISBN 0-920129-22-6, published in 1922. Unlike Funakoshi Sensei's later work Karate-Do Kyohan, in To-Te Jitsu, he himself is pictured demonstrating the kata. Almost all the many photo's of Funakoshi Sensei's technique show him in high and narrow stances.

    This is also evident in all of the original Okinawan masters films and books. Kenwa Mabuni, Kanken Toyama, Shimabuku and more.

    Also, search Youtube for video of Funakoshi Sensei performing the kata. It is amazing to see. When you see it, consider this; You are watching your teachers, teachers, teachers, teacher (or more!)

    If you have trouble locating the book, or videos, let me know, I will assist you.

    Oh, by the way, the so-called walking stances found in the first three Taegeuk Poomsae have nothing to do with Kyorugi Jasae (sparring stance). This issue was brought up at the Kukkiwon Instructors Course. The Sabum stated there was no such relation, nor intention.

    Alcohol

    Leave a comment:


  • GranFire
    replied
    Originally posted by JStinson View Post
    That is why I think changing forms is not a good idea. I know what you are talking about when it comes to "unlearning." I have to get people to do that when they have previous experience before coming to my school. Mainly lots of bad habits though. When I first learned the Chang Han set, I learned them "redone." Changed schools and found I was not doing them the way Choi had done them. All that work for 'nil.

    And since Choi is about reproach....


    I don't think forms is for naught, even in variation. Even in our micro organized place (national lvl that is) there are still great variations in the forms, though the rule states "as seen on DVD".

    As and act of learning I don't mind change and new forms. A leading neurologist has proven that by doing things our body is not accustomed to we form new connections in our brains, even as adults (while traditionally it's said these developments are halted at age three or so) and I am working out with a woman who is proof for that.

    But balancing two sets of forms, or more than one form per rank (depending on how much time in rank you will have) is a mental work out.


    And for the instructors...it does not matter if you add a new set to your curriculum or learn a completely new set. You will have to do the mental push up and learn one new set, well enough to teach to your students. take your Vitamins, get plenty of rest...it's a toughy!

    Leave a comment:

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