Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Medival Knight VS Japanese Samauri (sp)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Medival Knight VS Japanese Samauri (sp)

    I am doing research about the Medival Knights and the Japanese Samauri. Not which one was toughest or best but simply the similarities, differences, philosophies, training, terrain and time period. Please discuss. Any references or bibliographies would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance for your participation.

    Bowing Out.
    50
    Knight was better trained
    18.00%
    9
    Samauri was better trained
    82.00%
    41
    Last edited by Hardball; 12-04-2005, 01:03 PM. Reason: delete pic

  • #2
    hey hardball

    what about the ancient hwrang warriors or the monguls, bad dudes for sure,look at medeviel european ma web sites for info, also the society for creative anacroism where guys fight in armor with wooden weapons nuts!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Similarities:
      both had a fuedal contract
      Both had a code of conduct

      Differences:
      Religion
      Knights were more for the money
      style of combat

      Training:
      Kinghts trained from time they are old enough to use a sword or ride a horse. however there is no art that they used.
      Samurai were trained from a young age, about 7, in the arts of Iaido and Kenjitsu. when weapons were banned in Japan (1600-1850 roughly) they developed the art of Aikido.

      Terrain is irrelavent considering they both trained/fught on almost any type of terrain.

      Time Period:
      Kights- 700 AD-1750 AD roughly, they became just iconic symbols after that.
      Samurai- sometime aorund 400 AD- 1850 AD when the need for them was no longer there.

      I know a lot more this is just a starter. If you need more help let me know.

      Mullins

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by RYO9
        Similarities:
        both had a fuedal contract
        Both had a code of conduct

        Differences:
        Religion
        Knights were more for the money
        style of combat

        Training:
        Kinghts trained from time they are old enough to use a sword or ride a horse. however there is no art that they used.
        Samurai were trained from a young age, about 7, in the arts of Iaido and Kenjitsu. when weapons were banned in Japan (1600-1850 roughly) they developed the art of Aikido.

        Terrain is irrelavent considering they both trained/fught on almost any type of terrain.

        Time Period:
        Kights- 700 AD-1750 AD roughly, they became just iconic symbols after that.
        Samurai- sometime aorund 400 AD- 1850 AD when the need for them was no longer there.

        I know a lot more this is just a starter. If you need more help let me know.

        Mullins
        Thanks a lot. How about some references, bibliographies, sources.

        Bowing Out

        Comment


        • #5
          If anybody has any first hand knowledge due to ancestors, feel free to contribute to the discussion.

          Bowing Out

          Comment


          • #6
            kata kata

            the one thing thats inportont is finishing
            lots of people start things but few finish
            a butter fly sits on a piece of shit and is
            perfectly happy, man by his nature is
            never happy on his piece of shit.
            practice kata 108 times a day

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by millie
              the one thing thats inportont is finishing
              lots of people start things but few finish
              a butter fly sits on a piece of shit and is
              perfectly happy, man by his nature is
              never happy on his piece of shit.
              practice kata 108 times a day

              The most dangerous man in Japan only knew one Kata; but he did it every day.

              Grandmaster George Dillman

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Hardball
                The most dangerous man in Japan only knew one Kata; but he did it every day.

                Grandmaster George Dillman
                Hardball I truely hope you are joking. No disrespect to Dillman but "the most dangerous man in Japan"...I don't think so.

                Also, you may want to post in the Japanes and open access sections to get more responses

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by IPON
                  Hardball I truely hope you are joking. No disrespect to Dillman but "the most dangerous man in Japan"...I don't think so.

                  Also, you may want to post in the Japanes and open access sections to get more responses
                  Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not looking for quantity in responses but quality. So far the quality is decent, just need a couple of references on the medival knight. Ie. bibliographies, references. In fact I may do a google search.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RYO9
                    Samurai were trained from a young age, about 7, in the arts of Iaido and Kenjitsu. when weapons were banned in Japan (1600-1850 roughly) they developed the art of Aikido.
                    Mullins
                    with all due respect for your efforts in assisting the poster's request, i'm having trouble with this statement. are you sure the art of aikido was developed in japan around 1600-1850? i understand aikido to be a modern art (like karate and judo) which developed from earlier forms of jujitsu (particularly daitoryu jujitsu). certainly many jujitsu forms flourished in this period which paved the way for aikido in the 20th century.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mike Brewer
                      Time Life Books had published a history encyclopedia years and years ago that dealt with human civilization through the ages. I'll do some research and get back to you, but since I do know some trivial aspects, I'll put them out there.

                      Medieval Knights did in fact train in particular styles of combat - at least as much as the samurai can be said to have done so. In european swordplay (along with all the other weapons) there were recognized tactics and techniques, strategies, and training. I know we've referenced it in other areas of this forum, but you need to look up and read (it's a struggle, but worth the effort) George Silver's "Paradoxes of Defense" and in my opinion more importantly "Brief Instructions on My Paradoxes of Defense." These are written I believe in the 1400's and describe the finer points of weaponscraft. Many times, warriors would develop their own style of fighting and pass it along to novices in training. They didn't wear gi's, but the idea is the same. "This technique helped me stay alive last time a guy with a sword tried to kill me, and it'll probably help other people stay alive under similar circumstances, so I'll teach it to anyone who'll listen." It was every bit as stylized and catalogued as asian martial arts, but the people who practiced it were, in my humble opinion, far more pragmatic about why they trained than were their asian counterparts. To the samurai, the tradition was as much the art as the winning of the battle. To the knights, behavior was more important than tradition, and the fighting was only important for what power, wealth, and security it would bring to one's home.

                      I'll do some reading over the next few days and post some more.

                      Mike
                      Thanks Mike, I'll be looking for your follow up post.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        my moneys on the knight

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          hardball, hey i can give you all the information you need but i only have one source. World History by A. Speilvogal, everything else is from my teacher's research.

                          Blend, yes it is true. The only thing modren about Aikido is it's recent rise in popularity. it was developed by a group of samurai who decided to follow the law set forth by the emperor of japan. while jiu jitsu also developed in about the same time period, Aikido was something taught only to samurai. the reson they share similar techniques is simple, the thechniques work. both parties realized this and intigrated them into the systems. as memtioned before the creators of aikido chose to follow the law, the ones who didn't develpoed weapons hidden in Bamboo or in their clothing. both parties of samurai preserved the arts of Iaido and Kenjitsu, while they chose different ways to approach it. you will also notice that in true Aikido schools there is extremely strict discipline, this was brought forth by the traditions of the samurai. if you take nothing out of what i have just posted, at least have the respect to never compair Aikido and Karate ever again.

                          Mullins

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Brewer
                            Mullins,
                            I don't know why you sound so hostile and defensive about aikido.

                            Oh, you know why. Its because he's wants to imagine himself as 'a living embodiment of the spirit of the samurai' or some such childish romantic bs

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There you go again...

                              Originally posted by Mike Brewer
                              ....Medieval Knights did in fact train in particular styles of combat - at least as much as the samurai can be said to have done so. In european swordplay (along with all the other weapons) there were recognized tactics and techniques, strategies, and training. I know we've referenced it in other areas of this forum, but you need to look up and read (it's a struggle, but worth the effort) George Silver's "Paradoxes of Defense" and in my opinion more importantly "Brief Instructions on My Paradoxes of Defense." These are written I believe in the 1400's and describe the finer points of weaponscraft. .......

                              I'll do some reading over the next few days and post some more.

                              Mike


                              Paradoxes of Defense was published in 1599... Another one of my many fighting "secrets" revealed....

                              http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/paradoxes.html

                              http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/brief.html


                              See also; http://www.musketeer.org/online.html

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X